Distinguishing nudity from sexuality
Home / Latest / Why we need to distinguish nudity from sexuality
Latest

Why we need to distinguish nudity from sexuality

Large NatCorn Logo
© NatCorn

There has been an awful lot of misunderstanding this past week about the nude wave-pool event at a Calgary leisure centre that was cancelled. A lot of people expressed concern that the police were not taking worries seriously and that there would be children present and, therefore, pedophiles.

These concerns are certainly valid, and it’s understandable why someone would be confused as to the nature of the cancelled wave-pool night.

We all care about the safety of children, including participants of the cancelled event.

Most people think nudity is equal to sex, as that is often times what results when they see someone naked. Movies are rated based partly on how much nudity they have. You’d never take a kid to an NC17- or R-rated movie, so people mistakenly apply the same logic to nude activities. It’s pertinent to point out almost all nudity in movies is meant to be sexual. There are movies such as Schindlers’s List that have nudity in non-sexual ways, but those movies are incredibly rare. In fact, I can’t think of another one off the top of my head.

Distinguishing nudity from sexuality

There is nothing inherently sexual about nudity. You can be highly sexual with all of your clothes on. You can also be non-sexual with your clothes off.

But while some of the online comments directed at this event were from people who understand and defend social nudity, others clearly don’t understand it and apply their false ideas as the reason why children should not be at such events.

The idea that nudity is what would lead a pedophile to molest children is outrageous and offensive. First, it suggests that wearing clothes prevents rape. This contributes to rape culture by promoting the idea that someone “asked for it” by the way they are covering or not covering their body. By not exposing our society to non-sexual-nudity, we teach everyone that nudity equals sexuality. Having non-sexual-nude events encourages a culture of consent. It’s important to teach this so that people don’t just touch or take what they want without permission.

Continued…Read full original article…

Source: The Globe and Mail

Original publication 12 January, 2018

Posted on NatCorn 29th June 2020

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

I accept the Privacy Policy