Why sleep naked? Disrupted sleep from being too hot doesn’t just mean you’ll get less sleep overall, but it might mean less deep sleep, the most restorative type
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Why sleeping naked could cut your risk of diabetes… not to mention ward off infections, trim your waistline and make you less exhausted

NatCorn
NatCorn
  • One in three adults sleep in the nude according to a study by U.S. experts
  • They found sleeping naked helps burn calories and improves sleep quality
  • Those who sleep naked have happier love lives and lower risk of diabetes
  • Wearing nothing to bed can help women avoid yeast infections

David Cameron says he wears pyjamas, Donald Duck donned a nightcap and Marilyn Monroe wore just Chanel No 5 — but what is the best thing to wear in bed?

It seems that Marilyn might have been on to something.

One in three adults sleeps in the nude, according to an international study by the U.S. National Sleep Foundation, and it’s been shown to have all sorts of benefits.

Here, experts reveal how ditching pyjamas could improve your sleep quality, boost your relationship and may even help burn calories.

Some like it cool: Marilyn Monoe, pictured in 1961, famously said she wore only Chanel No 5 in bed. It seems the movie star might have been on to something
Douglas Kirkland/Corbis Some like it cool: Marilyn Monroe, pictured in 1961, famously said she wore only Chanel No 5 in bed. It seems the movie star might have been on to something : Douglas Kirkland /Corbis

Going naked means a good night’s sleep

Sleep experts agree it’s important to keep cool at night as your body (or ‘core’) temperature needs to drop by about half a degree for you to fall asleep.

The brain, driven by your internal body clock, sends messages to the blood vessels to open up and release heat.

‘Your core temperature is at its highest at 11pm and its lowest at 4am,’ says Dr Chris Idzikowski, director of the Edinburgh Sleep Centre and author of Sound Asleep: The Expert Guide To Sleeping Well.

‘If anything prevents that decline in temperature, the brain will wake itself up to see what’s going on, meaning you’ll struggle to get to sleep or you’ll have disturbed sleep.

Continued… Read full original article…

Source: Daily Mail

Original publication 24 November 2014

Posted on NatCorn 18th January 2021

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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