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Why are we taught shame about nudity and our bodies?

NatCorn
NatCorn

Humanity is the most unique species on this Earth. It’s because we are the only ones to cover our bodies. And we are taught to cover up in shame. We’re taught shame about nudity and our bodies, unlike any other species. Why? Here goes why.
Humanity began naked. The earliest humans lived naked, and they lived in rather warm climates. Clothing therefore wasn’t necessary and was rather impractical.

Why are we taught shame about nudity and our bodies?
Credit Uncertain Why are we taught shame about nudity and our bodies?

However, then humans started migrating north to North America, Europe, and Asia, and it was the Ice Age. Humans realized they had no hair or fur to not need any body covering. However, people were not ashamed of nudity or their bodies yet. It continued that way throughout ancient history. The human body was seen as innocent in ancient Greece and Italy, and the predecessor to today’s Olympic Games had the competitions done in the nude. Public nudity was then commonplace. Many societies lived naked until some centuries ago.

Indigenous peoples in the Western Hemisphere were abundant until the Western European conquest of the 16th to 19th centuries. Such peoples lived naked without shame, and those peoples remaining live that way even today. The indigenous peoples had indigenous religions practiced and did not require clothing. The European conquest changed everything, and the conquest extended to other parts of the world as well.

Religions have taught about being modestly dressed and shame about casual, non-sexual nudity.

The 18th and 19th centuries had clothing fashions cover the entire body.

As more clothing became required, even when impractical to have it worn, nudity became limited to less circumstances.

As nudity became limited to less circumstances, more parents taught their children that nudism is wrong.

Continued… Read full original article…

Source: Naturally Carolina

Original publication 10 January, 2021

Posted on NatCorn 24th January 2021

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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