Alice hopes that the sight of her own body will give her son an understanding of what a real body looks like.
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When should kids stop seeing their parents naked?

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When Jenny Wishart’s​ son was 3, she had an appointment for her annual pap smear, but no childcare. Instead of cancelling an important health appointment, she decided to bring him along, imagining he would play with some toys in a corner while she sat bare-bottomed in front of the gynaecologist.

“The procedure is happening and before you know it, this little head pops up to say hello,” said Wishart, who blogs about her life in Wellington as a mum of two boys. “Children are so naturally curious.”

Whether parents like to admit it or not, their children have probably seen them naked more times than either party cares to count.

Alice is raising her 3-year-old son in a naturist lifestyle.
SUPPLIED/STUF Alice is raising her 3-year-old son in a naturist lifestyle.

It could be a parent demonstrating how to use the toilet. Or the clash between supervising a child and a desperate need for a shower. Or, for parents in the naturist movement, intentionally showing their kids the joys of being in the buff.

But for something so common, it’s still a subject that can leave parents red-faced and confused about when and how to set healthy boundaries.

“While you may or may not be comfortable being naked around your tamariki, we should be teaching our children what a normal adult body looks like and when it is and isn’t OK to be naked,”

Anne Marie Morris, a PlunketLine manager

“While you may or may not be comfortable being naked around your tamariki, we should be teaching our children what a normal adult body looks like and when it is and isn’t OK to be naked,” said Anne Marie Morris, a PlunketLine manager, in a statement to Stuff.

Parents will have different levels of comfort in being naked with their child and that can change from culture to culture, said Morris. Ultimately, healthy boundaries should be child-led.

“Your tamariki will use cues when they’re no longer comfortable being naked around you, for example asking to use the bathroom alone or wanting to change in their room privately,” she said.

Continued…Read full original article…

Source: Stuff

Original publication 22 September, 2020

Posted on NatCorn 3 weeks ago

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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