Ms. McMullen, a flight attendant who lives with her husband at Lake Como full time, said she felt much more creative when she cooked in the nude.
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The Joy of Cooking Naked

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The Joy of Cooking Naked

Despite the occasional splatter burn, nudists say their relationship to eating, at home or in restaurants, is better and healthier without all the clothing.

Karyn McMullen is tired of being asked how she cooks bacon without any clothes on.

It’s one of those jokes people can’t help but make about nudists, and to Ms. McMullen, who has been cooking naked for more than two decades, it shows how misunderstood nudism is. Many people think only about the pitfalls — spattering fat, minor burns — and not the benefits.

A dinner party at Jack Clark’s house in the Lake Como Family Nudist Resort in Lutz, Fla.: from left, Jayson and Karyn McMullen, Mr. Clark and Charlie Herndon
Jason Henry for The New York Times A dinner party at Jack Clark’s house in the Lake Como Family Nudist Resort in Lutz, Fla.: from left, Jayson and Karyn McMullen, Mr. Clark and Charlie Herndon

“Embracing the nudist lifestyle has given me permission to feel my feelings,” she said one morning as she sautéed bell peppers while wearing nothing but a glittery manicure in her home kitchen at the Lake Como Family Nudist Resort in Lutz, about 20 miles north of Tampa. She lives here with her husband, Jayson McMullen.

“But if you want to know the truth,” she added with a resigned sigh, “I buy precooked bacon, and I microwave it on a paper towel.”

The McMullens are two of more than 10 million Americans who identify as nudists, or naturists, according to a 2011 study, the latest available, by the marketing services company Ypartnership and the Harrison Group. Some historians say the modern naturist movement in the West emerged in Europe in the 18th century as a means of promoting health, exposing the body to fresh air and sunlight; others trace its origins to Germany in the 19th century, as an effort to resist industrialization by living simpler and closer to nature.

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Source: New York Times

Original publication 4 February, 2020

Posted on NatCorn 4th March 2020

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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