Ease into enjoying the health benefits of being naked by starting somewhere you're comfortable: The bedroom.

The health benefits of being naked: How stripping down is good for you

NatCorn
NatCorn

It turns out being naked is not only more comfortable, but can be surprisingly good for your health.

How many times during this year’s super hot and humid summer did you just wish you could strip all of your clothes off to cool down?

Well, it turns out being naked may not only be more comfortable but healthier as well. Some experts say that donning your birthday suit more often can help with myriad physical and psychological problems.

So how do you reap the benefits?

First, start in a place you’re a bit more used to being naked: the bedroom. Of course, being in the buff can help bring you closer in your relationship, but it can also aid you in getting a better night’s sleep.

Ditching tight clothes could be another route to getting smoother skin.
Rob Donnelly / TODAY Ditching tight clothes could be another route to getting smoother skin. | Rob Donnelly / TODAY

According to the D.C.-based nonprofit the National Sleep Foundation, in order to have a normal sleep schedule and sleep comfortably, your body needs to reach an optimal temperature of around 65 degrees Fahrenheit.

Losing the pajamas is an easy way to lower your body temp — which may in turn lead to other benefits: a 2014 study in the journal Diabetes found that sleeping in lower temperatures can help increase your levels of metabolism-boosting brown fat.

Now that you’ve got an easy way to get a better night’s sleep and lose some body fat, how about smoothing out your skin? Restrictive clothing and undergarments often leave indentations and marks all over our bodies, leading to drying and wrinkling of the skin.

“Going naked is great for healthy skin,” plastic surgeon and skincare expert Dr. Michael Fiorillo told us. “It helps the elimination of sweat toxins that clothing can reintroduce to the body and better overall blood circulation.”

Continued… Read full original article…

Source: Today

Original publication 25 September, 2018

Posted on NatCorn 23rd February 2021

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