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The Doukhobors (or Dujobori), Svobodniki and Freedomites (or Sons of Freedom)

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They are one of the most curious religious minorities, such as the Quakers, Mormons or the Amish. Its origin is in the South of Russia and in the 18th century. Drawing on some elements of Christianity, but rejecting the Orthodox Church and its hierarchy, they preached spiritualism, brotherhood, simplicity, vegetarianism, nudity and pacifism, and gave special importance to singing. When, in the last years of the 19th century, in an area near the border with Armenia, they were made to take up arms to defend themselves against a possible attack from the neighboring country, the dujobori or doukhobors (“spiritual fighters”) burned their weapons, which it provoked the wrath of the tsars and a strong persecution. Nicholas I banished those who did not submit to the Caucasus and Transcaucasia, and Nicholas II sent several leaders of the group to Siberia. When Lev Tolstoi was aware of the situation of those people, who in his opinion embodied Christian principles very faithfully, he took his side and used the proceeds from his novel Resurrection (1899) to help the Dujobori so that they could emigrate to Canada. which they did between 1899 and 1904, with the support also of the English Quakers. There they initially settle in Saskatchewan and Eastern Alberta. Already in those early years they stripped sometimes to demonstrate as a form of protest. with the support also of the English Quakers. There they initially settle in Saskatchewan and Eastern Alberta. Already in those early years they stripped sometimes to demonstrate as a form of protest. with the support also of the English Quakers. There they initially settle in Saskatchewan and Eastern Alberta. Already in those early years they stripped sometimes to demonstrate as a form of protest.

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Credit Uncertain The Doukhobors (or Dujobori), Svobodniki and Freedomites (or Sons of Freedom)

In 1906 they clashed with the Canadian Minister of the Interior, Frank Oliver, who demanded that they register their lands individually and not as communal property, as they wanted. Then a fragmentation of the group began. Most joined the Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood, the CCUB, with Peter V. Verigin as its leader, and moved to British Columbia around 1908, where they received mortgage loans to establish farms and establishments. industries. Others accepted the terms proposed by the government and remained in their settlements, integrating thereafter into various Christian churches.

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Source: Histonudismo

Original publication 7 November, 2020

Posted on NatCorn 2 weeks ago

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