Tag Archives: Cornwall

Visit Cornwall releases video urging tourists to stay away

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Cornwall’s tourism body, Visit Cornwall, has released a video to encourage people not to visit the county ahead of Easter and to remind people not to travel during the coronavirus pandemic and to visit later in the year.

Chief executive Malcolm Bell said the video had been created to reinforce the message to people not to travel to Cornwall.

The video, titled ‘Time to Reflect‘ urges people to stay at home and to support health services and key workers.

The government has said that only necessary travel is allowed and that going on holiday is not deemed necessary and thus not allowed.

Video “Time to Reflect” by Visit Cornwall

Posted on NatCorn 2 days ago

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The iconic Cornish beaches which could disappear due to coastal erosion

Cornwall is affected by climate change a lot

Fistral beach and Holywell Bay are two of Cornwall’s beaches which could disappear under water if sea levels rise by several meters.

Cornwall is one of the UK counties which are the most affected by climate change. Cliffs are eroding and flooding risks are increasing.

This is when Cornwall's iconic beaches would disappear
FireTree This is when Cornwall’s iconic beaches would disappear

As temperatures are going up, ice is melting and the sea levels are rising.

Data provided by NASA and shared via FireTree shows that Cornwall could lose most of its coast and beaches it is renowned for.

The website provides maps of the areas around the world which will be flooded according to how high the sea levels will rise.

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Source: CornwallLive

Original publication 24 January, 2020

Posted on NatCorn 20th February 2020

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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Forget winter sun – a solo trip to Cornwall could be exactly what you need

It’s completely natural to spend January dreaming of white sands, palm trees and warm, crystal clear oceans.

At this point, we have been engulfed in darkness for so long that we have forgotten what it feels like to be warm, we haven’t seen daylight in months and we literally never take our coats off. The sun? We don’t know her. But, before we blow our life savings on a long-haul flight to somewhere exotic and permanently boiling, it’s worth considering something closer to home. Cornwall, on the rugged south-westerly tip of the country, has 400 miles of coastline, with 158 miles designated as Heritage Coast. That’s a whole lot of natural beauty. And the best thing about visiting in the winter – you’ll basically have it all to yourself.

Empty beaches = inner peace
Metro Empty beaches = inner peace

This January, I took myself off for a solo beach holiday to Newquay. And it was just what I needed. After a manic festive period with just a couple of days away from the rat race, heading to the coast on my own was the perfect antidote and an incredible way to reset and recharge for the new decade.

It was the longest trip I have ever done completely on my own, and I can’t recommend it enough. Starting the new year by taking a few days to prioritise your own needs, with literally no responsibility to anyone else, is the best gift of self-care you can give yourself.

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Source: Metro

Original publication 18 January, 2020

Posted on NatCorn 14th February 2020

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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One woman’s experience of a Cornish Veganuary

This month there has been a word that, when uttered, has sparked off a plethora of media attention, marketing and discussion.

No, not Brexit. Veganuary.

One woman's experience of a Cornish Veganuary
Vegan

Whether you love it or hate it, a bit like Marmite (which is animal-product free), you cannot deny people are becoming more aware of it.

Officials at Veganuary announced on their Facebook page earlier this month that more than 370,000 people have signed up to try living the Vegan lifestyle.

I too signed up. Who am I? No one in particular. Just a resident of Cornwall trying to do my bit to help climate change – but how easy is it being a vegan in West Cornwall?

Actually, so far, quite easy. In fact, there seems to be so much on offer I felt spoiled for choice.

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Source: This is the westcountry

Original publication 18 January, 2020

Posted on NatCorn 13th February 2020

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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Cornwall’s Longest Beach

In Cornwall we really are blessed with some of the country’s finest coastline and it’s most beautiful beaches. There are literally hundreds to choose from. We have prehistoric beaches, beaches with shipwrecks, lots of shipwrecks. Beaches with smugglers, beaches with treasure and romantic rock carvings. There are so many fascinating stories. But one such beach in Cornwall not only has some fascinating history attached, it is also a must for an entirely different reason.

At low tide Cornwall’s longest beach stretches for 3 fabulous miles between Hayle and Godrevy Head.

Known as Gwithian Towans Beach, or at the other end Godrevy Beach, this magnificent stretch of golden sand really is one of Cornwall’s finest.

It’s position on the dramatic north coast means that the Atlantic swell and prevailing winds makes this both a surfer’s paradise and a great place for kitesurfers and windsurfers alike.

But with 3 miles of sand to choose from there is plenty of room for everyone. And plenty of opportunity for swimmers and the bucket and spade brigade too!

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Source: The Cornish Bird

Original publication 12 April, 2019

Posted on NatCorn 21st January 2020

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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The Divers Swim Naked In The Waters Of The Historical Mining Pools Of Cornwall (Brazil)

Laura Evans, a wild swimming enthusiast, said today: “Swimming naked is one of those pleasures that money can’t buy.”

Many of the pools are relics of the Cornwall mining industry and have been forgotten or destroyed in the last 50 years.

Naked divers flock to the impressive and secret coastal mining pools of Cornwall, claiming that being naked at sea improves their health and brings them closer to nature.

She added: ‘With the tidal pools that offer privacy, it means you can undress and enjoy the water in a truly immersive way. When appropriate, it is the only way to choose to swim. ‘

Naked divers, many of whom prefer to be called ‘wild swimmers’, have been swimming in artificial wells for the past 50 years, but have been empty since the end of the Cornwall tin mining industry.

Many of them are on the coast and naturally fill with water, and their unique shape makes them perfect pools.

Swimming naked in Britain is not illegal unless it causes an ‘alarm or shame’ to witnesses or has a sexual motive.

In western Cornwall, there is a pool known as Pullandase in the Kenidjack Valley, once an important tin mining area where the remains of the industry are still visible today.

Although hard to reach, Pullandase is still popular with wild swimmers, including Miss. Evans, by St Ives.

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Source: Naturismo Peru / ANNLI (Naturism / National and International Nudism)

Original publication 19 December, 2019

Posted on NatCorn 18th January 2020

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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Cornwall named staycation hotspot for 2020

The restaurant scene is a major draw for visitors

Cornwall has been named a top staycation hotspot for 2020 – with more than one in three Brits looking to book a visit this year.

A new survey of more than 2,000 people by Caterer.com, the UK hospitality job board, revealed seven in ten Brits are looking to holiday at home twice this year, adding £27 billion to the UK economy.

Cornwall’s restaurant scene is considered to be a major drawcard – with nearly one in five (14%) considering it a foodie hotspot.

Blue skies over St Ives, as holiday-makers Paul and Sue Johnson enjoy the warm weather and chilly waters
Greg Martin Blue skies over St Ives, as holiday-makers Paul and Sue Johnson enjoy the warm weather and chilly waters

A popularity increase in the staycation industry has also sparked a hospitality jobs boom as hotels, restaurants and bars hire to keep up with growing demand. More than 315,000 jobs were advertised on Caterer.com last year.

Unfortunately, Cornwall has narrowly missed out for 2020, as the Lake District has been declared the top staycation spot, with nearly half (45%) of people considering holidaying in this location. 

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Source: CornwallLive

Original publication 10 January 2020

Posted on NatCorn 11th January 2020

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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Jamie Oliver’s Fifteen Cornwall Shuts Down With Immediate Effect

The social enterprise is to close following ‘an independent financial review’.

Jamie Oliver’s Fifteen Cornwall restaurant is closing with immediate effect, putting up to 100 jobs at risk.

The social enterprise, at Watergate Bay near Newquay, and run separately from the TV chef’s food empire, is to shut down following “an independent financial review”.

It has helped train dozens of unemployed or disadvantaged workers since 2006.

Jamie Oliver

Despite carrying Mr Oliver’s name under licence, Fifteen Cornwall is owned by the Cornwall Food Foundation (CFF) and Mr Oliver has no financial ties to the restaurant.

In a statement, the CFF said:  “As a charity and social enterprise restaurant we have welfare and safeguarding responsibilities which we are doing our utmost to resolve.

“We are talking with partners to find a way for the support for people we work with to continue, including those on the Fifteen training programme and Food for Change. ”

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Source: Minute Hack

Original publication 13 December, 2019

Posted on NatCorn 15th December 2019

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

Beatrix Potter in Cornwall

“Down the wooded lanes, around the twisting of the Helford Creek. Between the bank smothered in primroses, up again along a steep hill with the sun slanting through the blackthorns, passed a great old walled farm with high closed gateway, and a white cat basking in the sunset at a barn door high up in the wall. Then a fine view of brilliant sea, and back into Falmouth past the Swan Pool.” – Beatrix Potter, March 1892.

The famous children’s writer Beatrix Potter first visited Cornwall for an Easter holiday with her family in March 1892. Miss. Potter recorded all her observations from their visit – the places, people and wildlife – in her coded journal. This diary, which Beatrix kept between the ages of 15 and 30, was written in a code of her own invention. And that code was finally cracked by Leslie Linder in the 1960s. The following extracts about the Potter’s time in Cornwall are taken from Linder’s transcription.

Beatrix Potter

At the time of Beatrix Potter’s first holiday in Cornwall she was just 26 years old and still unknown. It was a sunny spring day when the family arrived by train onto the platform of Falmouth station. In fact, the weather that year had been unseasonably warm and dry and the Potters had sunshine every day of their twelve day visit.

Beatrix’s writing show that she was quickly captivated by the hustle and bustle of the busy town of Falmouth and the beauty of the surrounding countryside.

“The spring growth is far more advanced here, green leaves burst on Hawthorn and some Sycamores, where in London are bare sticks . . . we never before had such a glory for weather, cloudless days, burning sun and the air so pure that it transmits every smell within twenty yards, from wall-flowers to fish and manure.”

During their holiday the Potter family took a horse and cart with a local driver to many of Cornwall’s most popular tourist spots. They spent days out on the Lizard and at Land’s End, visited the numerous formal gardens in the area, as well as hunting for cowrie shells on Castle Beach. The long drive to the Lizard “took place as usual in cloudless sunshine” and Potter comments that the dust coating the hedges made them look as if they were “powdered with snow”.

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Source: The Cornish Bird

Original publication 20 October 2019

Posted on NatCorn 29th October 2019

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

Wife selling in Cornwall

Would it surprise you to learn that the practice of wife selling was particularly popular in the 17th century? Divorce was almost impossible for anyone but the very rich and as a consequence some husbands sort rather a interesting alternative solution. This bizarre practice was apparently more common in rural counties such as Cornwall and Devon. Indeed folklorist Sabine Baring-Gould dedicated a whole chapter to wife selling in his book Devonshire Characters and Strange Events .

Sale of a wife in Smithfield Market an ancient picture

‘There is no myth relative to the manners and customs of the English that in my experience is more tenaciously held by the ordinary Frenchman than that the sale of a wife in the market place is an habitual and an accepted fact in English Life.’ SBG, 1908

The practice of selling your wife was never legal, or indeed morally acceptable, but it is clear that these transactions did occur. And not on such an irregular basis that they can be brushed under the carpet as a rare social anomaly. My own research has uncovered a number of fascinating cases in Cornwall’s history. Cases when Cornish men took their wives to market, not to do the shopping but as the produce!

Given that the practice wasn’t ever legal the sale of a wife had a number of surprisingly well established rituals.

Usually an announcement of the intended auction would be spread either by word of mouth, printed on posters or even in the local press. The husband might advertise his wife’s positive attributes, her abilities as a cook or as a farm-worker perhaps. On the appointed day the husband would parade his wife, usually at a marketplace. The lady was traditionally haltered with a leather strap at the neck, arm or waist. Then the wife was simply sold to the highest bidder. Sometimes a written contract was exchanged as proof of the transaction. Often the deal was completed with just the handing over of the money and a handshake.

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Source: The Cornish Bird

Original publication 8 October 2019

Posted on NatCorn 10th October 2019

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

Cornwall is the second most family-friendly holiday destination in Europe
It was the top spot within the UK

Cornwall has been picked as one of the best family-friendly holiday destinations in Europe.

Planning the perfect family holiday is no easy task, with parents facing the challenge to keep their children entertained.

From ensuring there are hotels that cater to family needs, checking the area has plenty of activities and keeping travel time to a minimum, there are multiple factors that contribute to the perfect family holiday.

Thankfully, Columbus Direct has analysed popular holiday destinations within a 5-hour, or less, flight time from London to show the 20 best locations for a family-friendly holiday.

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Source: CornwallLive

Original publication 30 JUL 2019

Posted on NatCorn 7th August 2019

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Britain’s most daring regions revealed as London and Cornwall top list of nude sunbathers – where does your town rank?
BRITAIN’S most daring regions have been revealed as London tops the list of nude sunbathers.

Summer temperatures are set to reach heights of 37C this week with more than a quarter of all Brits set to soak up the rays in the buff.

A poll of 2,000 found that that 31 per cent of us – that’s 620 in all – sunbathed naked regularly when the sun came out.

London topped the research with 42 per cent of people stripping off with Northern Ireland second with 39, then the Midlands 37, Cornwall 33 and Scotland with 31 per cent.

Those in Norfolk were the most restrained, with just 22 per cent confessing to sunbathing in the altogether.

Bosses at Hotels.com, who carried out the research, said naturist beaches were “fast becoming go-to travel hotspots” – with 20 per cent of those polled saying they loved going to them and stripping off completely.

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Source: The Sun

Original publication 22 Jul 2019

Posted on NatCorn 23rd July 2019

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Four Cornwall beaches named among the cleanest and safest in the UK
Blue Flags, Seaside Awards, and water quality ratings have all been taken into account

A list of the UK’s cleanest and safest beaches has been compiled by Ann’s Cottage surf shop.

Four Cornish beaches have been named among the top 11; Porthtowan, Porthmeor, Carbis Bay, and Widemouth Sand.

The research has taken several factors into account. Each of the featured locations has earned itself a water quality rating of ‘excellent’, a Blue Flag status, a Seaside Award, and has proven negligible traces of e. coli or enterococci in the past year.

Porthtowan Beach
Porthtowan Beach

The annual Blue Flag and Seaside Awards were announced last month. This year Cornwall has the second most Blue Flag and Seaside Awards in the UK, behind Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole.

Six beaches in the county have received both Blue Flag and Seaside status; Gyllyngvase in Falmouth, Porthmeor in St Ives, Porthtowan, Widemouth Bay, Trevone Bay and Newquay’s Great Western.

Allison Ogden-Newton, chief executive of Keep Britain Tidy, the organisation responsible for the awards in the UK, said: “Visiting beaches with the Blue Flag or Seaside Award status means beach-goers can feel more relaxed in a setting that is environmentally considerate.”

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Source: CornwallLive

Original publication 3 JUN 2019

Posted on NatCorn 7th June 2019

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Almost 200 swimmers take the plunge in Cornwall charity skinny dip
Dozens of skinny dippers braved chilly sea temperatures

Nearly 200 skinny dippers braved chilly sea temperatures as they stripped off and bared all for charity.

The event, in aid of the mental health charity Mind, was held at Summerleaze Beach in Bude on Sunday morning.

Brave dippers
Brave dippers

Organiser Ruth Hunt was inspired by the work of the North East skinny dip – an established annual event now in its seventh year which has raised over £40,000 for Mind.

Teacher Ruth said she spends time simply listening to children who come to her with their troubles and sees first-hand how the pressures of modern day life are affecting the well-being of children and young people as well as adults.

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Source: CornwallLive

Original publication 19 MAY 2019

Posted on NatCorn 26th May 2019

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Cornwall’s Blue Flag or Seaside Award beaches 2019 are named
Cornwall has more Blue Flag and Seaside Awards than any other region in the UK

More than a dozen beaches in Cornwall have been awarded for being among the cleanest and safest in the UK.

The 14 Cornwall beaches to have achieved either world-renowned Blue Flag or Seaside Award status – or both – will be celebrated at Trevone Bay, Padstow, on Wednesday [15 May].

Blue Flags, an international quality mark for beaches, reassure visitors and locals that Cornwall’s key areas are clean, safe and recommended, boosting tourism, business and helping inspire return visits.

Blue Flags and Seaside Awards are only awarded to coastal destinations that boast the highest qualities of water, facilities, safety, keep clean programmes, environmental management.

Porthtowan Beach
Porthtowan

Alongside this, Blue Flag beaches have to run a minimum of five educational activities for the local community and visitors to make people aware of the importance of looking after the natural environment.

Six Cornwall beaches have received both Blue Flag and Seaside status; Gyllyngvase in Falmouth , Porthmeor in St Ives , Porthtowan, Widemouth Bay, Trevone Bay and Newquay’s Great Western.

Crackington Haven, Perranporth, Polzeath, Porth, Porthminster, Sennen, Crooklets and Summerleaze were awarded Seaside Awards.

This year Cornwall has the second most Blue Flag and Seaside Awards in the UK, behind Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole.

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Source: CornwallLive

Original publication 15 MAY 2019

Posted on NatCorn 20th May 2019