CGI of the proposed development at Carlyon Bay which has had new planning applications submitted to Cornwall Council
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New images show off Carlyon Bay beach development plans

NatCorn
NatCorn

Planning applications have now been submitted to Cornwall Council for the revised development at Crinnis Beach in Carlyon Bay

New images have been released showing how a major development of homes and leisure facilities at Carlyon Bay could look when completed.

Six reserved matters planning applications have been submitted to Cornwall Council for the development which has been decades in the making.

Planning permission has already been granted for a development of 511 homes along with leisure facilities and sea defences at Carlyon Bay.

CGI of the proposed development at Carlyon Bay which has had new planning applications submitted to Cornwall Council
Credit Uncertain CGI of the proposed development at Carlyon Bay which has had new planning applications submitted to Cornwall Council

And now the detailed plans for the first phase of the development at Crinnis have been submitted by developers CEG.

Under the wider plans there are proposals to redevelop Crinnis, Shorthorn and Polgaver beaches which stretch across the length of the bay.

The new planning applications provide revised proposals for the development at Crinnis.

While it retains the 361 homes to be built at the site, it alters the previously approved sea wall sea defences and provides for smaller food and drink outlets and shops.

The proposals also include gardens instead of the previously planned hard promenades, but still maintain good access to the beach.

A design and access statement submitted with the plans sets out that Crinnis will accommodate 70 per cent of the overall development area.

It says it will “incorporate urban design principles associated with traditional Cornish villages” and will consider the local climate, ecology and wildlife habitats.

Continued…Read full original article…

Source: CornwallLive

Carlyon Bay on NatCorn

Original publication 5 December, 2020

Posted on NatCorn 17th December 2020

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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