Fathima, in her petition, had contended that female nudity, per se, will not constitute obscenity and children painting on their mother’s body cannot be construed as child abuse.
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Children painting on mother’s semi-nude body gives wrong impression about our culture: SC

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The court was hearing an anticipatory bail by Fathima AS, who is apprehending arrest for offences under the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act, 2012, and Information Technology (IT) Act, 2000, after she uploaded a video on social media of her two minor children painting on her semi-nude body in June.

The Supreme Court (SC) on Friday [7 August] took exception to a Kerala-based activist uploading a video on social media of her two minor children painting on her semi-nude body.

A three-judge SC bench, headed by Justice Arun Mishra, remarked that such acts are in bad taste and give children the wrong impression about the country’s culture.

“You might be an activist, but why do you do all these? What kind of nonsense is this? What impression will your kids get about the culture of the country?”

Justice Arun Mishra
Fathima, in her petition, had contended that female nudity, per se, will not constitute obscenity and children painting on their mother’s body cannot be construed as child abuse.
Burhaan Kinu/HT PHOTO Fathima, in her petition, had contended that female nudity, per se, will not constitute obscenity and children painting on their mother’s body cannot be construed as child abuse.

“You might be an activist, but why do you do all these? What kind of nonsense is this? What impression will your kids get about the culture of the country?” Justice Mishra asked.

The court was hearing an anticipatory bail by Fathima AS, who is apprehending arrest for offences under the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act, 2012, and Information Technology (IT) Act, 2000, after she uploaded a video on social media of her two minor children painting on her semi-nude body in June.

The controversial video led to the registration of the case against her indulging in child pornography under the POCSO Act, 2012, and for publishing such content, which is an offence, under the IT Act, 2000.

The Kerala high court (HC) had rejected her anticipatory bail plea on July 24.

“It is an obscenity. And you are spreading it. It will leave a very bad taste,” Justice Mishra said.

Continued…Read full original article…

Source: Hindustan Times

Original publication 7 August, 2020

Posted on NatCorn 17th August 2020

Reference to an article does not infer endorsement of any views expressed.

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